• Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Advance health care directive, Artificial respiration, Euthanasia, Healthcare law, Medical ethics,
    October 14, 2013

    Cancer Therapy – Planning for the ...

    The chances for living a long and healthy life are now greater than ever before. Age is just a number that measures time. As George Burns said, “You...
  • Health maintenance organization, Kaiser Permanente, Managed care, Healthcare,
    October 13, 2013

    Managed Care and Oncology – New Wa...

    Since the 1950s there has been a profound shift in patterns of payment for health care. Before World War II, we simply paid for medical expenses out o...
  • Medicare, Medigap, Prescription drug, Medicare Advantage,
    October 13, 2013

    Paying for Cancer Care – Types of ...

    Paying for cancer care is in many respects different from paying for a single illness or a health event, such as an operation. Care extends over month...
  • Health maintenance organization, national coalition on health care, private insurance, sleep disorders,
    September 17, 2013

    Paying for Care – Health care cove...

    If you’ve paid attention to national news at all lately, you’ve probably heard or read about the call for health-care reform. Many people are expe...
  • life care Credential, Institute for Credentialing Excellence, Rehabilitation counseling, National Commission for Certifying Agencies,
    September 12, 2013

    Credentialing and Other Issues in Life ...

    Introduction Credentialing in support of one’s professional work in health-care-related fields has exploded with an apparent increasing array of cer...




Happiness, Anxiety, Gambling, Social Sciences, Mental Health, Emotional contagion, Empathy, Emotion, Yawn, Psychology, Sociology, Six degrees of separation, Social network,

How Your Thoughts Catches Psychosocial Colds

“It would be difficult to exaggerate the degree to which we are influenced by those we influence.”  - ERIC HOFFER, THE PASSIONATE STATE OF MIND You Feeling Me? You may well be at a social gathering with only some friends and everyone appears to be having a good time. The chit-chat is casual and upbeat, as that you can predict. The tune is loud, and it’s hard to hearken to any individual conversing higher than a pair toes away, on the other hand you begin paying attention to what you feel is yelling coming from the far side of the room. You tune in extra, and now you’re sure it’s yelling—two male voices shouting louder and louder over the observe. You commence taking walks that implies, along side quite a lot of folks, and rapidly every person else on the get together with the exception of for the two adult males yelling are circling throughout the…

Cerebrum, Mind, Social Sciences, Psychology, Magnetic resonance imaging, Probability interpretations,

Brain Decision Making and The Great Truth Rub Off

“For certainly, at the level of social life, what is called the adjustment of man to his environment takes place through the medium of fictions.” —WALTER LIPPMAN, PUBLIC OPINION Assumption by Committee Simply the previous evening you headed off to see a motion picture that resists straightforward arrangement. A few movies are obviously awful, others are clearly great, yet this one doesn’t channel so effortlessly through the quality sifter. You end up hunting the Web down audits. When you stop to contemplate it, this is an odd thing to do after you have seen the motion picture. Typically you might counsel surveys to discover if a film is worth your time and cash yet thus you are doing it to figure out what others pondered the film despite the fact that you have as of recently viewed it. You likewise post a note on your long range interpersonal communication site inquiring as to whether…

happy brain, Capuchin monkey, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Impression formation, Social Sciences, Psychology, Sociology, Social network, Social systems, Grammatical person, Personality psychology, Social network service,

Brain Socializing with Monkeys Like Us

“Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding.” —RALPH WALDO EMERSON, CONDUCT OF LIFE Monkey See, Monkey Drama Professor Laurie Santos is one of the leading primatologists in the country. As the director of the Yale University CapLab (aka, the Comparative Cognition Laboratory), she has developed an understanding of capuchin monkey social systems that is challenging many of our long-held assumptions about monkey and human distinctions. At times, she explains, watching the capuchins is just like watching a human soap opera (without the cheesy dialogue). Monkeys display jealousy, grief, worry, joy, and a range of other emotions that we used to think were exclusive to humans. They also cheat on their partners, steal, and alienate others, just like humans do. As it turns out, the dynamics of monkey society are not unlike our own—in some ways, they are startlingly similar. What is not the same, Santos points…

Reward system, Brain Want

Brain Want, Get, Regret, Repeat

“I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations—one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: Do it or do not do it—you will regret both.” —SØREN KIERKEGAARD, BALANCE BETWEEN ESTHETIC AND ETHICAL, VOL. 2: “EITHER/OR” Going Z Instead of Y…Oh Why? Madison was never entirely sure that she wanted to become a lawyer. After spending two years at a law firm, she was becoming absolutely certain that she should never have become one. Her expectations for the profession may have been distorted, or perhaps she simply had a naive view of the law from the start. She was willing to concede these points, but doing so was not making her day-to-day existence any easier. To continue on in a profession that failed to inspire any degree of passion and commitment was a horrible prospect, but how could she possibly change direction after years on this road, to…

Brain Restraint , Weight loss, Insulin resistance, Patient, Obesity, Dieting,

Brain Restraint – Writing Promises on an Etch-a-Sketch

“I can resist everything except temptation.” —OSCAR WILDE, LADY WINDERMERE’S FAN This Time I Really Promise Robert is a well-regarded pharmacologist who runs a clinic for diabetes patients in Orlando, Florida. Many patients of this clinic do not want to begin a regimen of insulin shots (due to the obvious reason: pain, and the stigma of having to take them) even though they have failed to control their blood glucose by other means. Weight loss offers the only real hope of eliminating their need for insulin, and patients will often beg for another chance to lose weight so they can avoid the need for shots. Nearly 100 percent of the time, in the pharmacologist’s experience, this cycle continues indefinitely (or until he stops it): At each appointment the patient will beg for another opportunity to begin losing weight and will express his or her seriousness “this time.” But very few ever follow through. There…

Laser, Motivation, Feedback, Weight loss, Percentile rank, Control theory,

Brain Motivation – Revving Your Engine in Idle

“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.” —MARK TWAIN, FROM A LETTER TO AN UNIDENTIFIED PERSON Beating the System Like a Drum I’d like to introduce you to a most unlikely master of industry. We begin by observing Mike in high school. He is, to use the vernacular of the eighties, a “total burnout.” He misses classes and chronically shows up late for the ones he does attend. The only thing he makes sure never to miss are parties. At those, he’s a fixture. He sleeps very little and parties very hard—and he’s a thread shy of being kicked out of school. What almost no one realizes about this young man is that he really does have a quite lofty aspiration: He wants to learn everything there is to know about lasers. From a very young age, he was fascinated with light—from flashlights to fluorescents—and…

Tales, Aesop's Fables, Human brain, Dopamine, Brain stimulation reward, Psychology, Behavior, Reward system, Human behavior,

Brain Immersion and the Great Escape from Loneliness

“Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.” —AESOP, AESOP’S FABLES, “THE DOG AND THE SHADOW” When the Web Was Young Idistinctly remember the day I first saw the graphical World Wide Web (WWW). It’s one of those “where were you when” moments that usually append a historic tragedy, but in this case it was the unveiling of a technology that would change the world in ways both fantastic and tragic. It was 1993, and I was in the University of Florida Interactive Media Lab, where a small group of classmates and I convened to witness what at the time was described as a “graphical overlay for the World Wide Web,” called Mosaic. Only a minority of people knew such a thing as the WWW existed at all. In its monochrome, all-text form, there was little in it to excite the masses. Information hounds and users of bulletin board systems (think of…

Cerebrum, Mind-wandering, Bertrand Russell, Human brain, Prefrontal cortex,

Your Happy Brain and The Magnetism of Autopilot

“All that is gold does not glitter; not all those who wander are lost.” —J. R. R. TOLKIEN, THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING Time Traveling Homeward You are driving home one night after work, later than typical, with a lot on your mind lingering from a busy day. Most of your thirty-minute drive is on the highway, and as you get on the road, you are pleased to see that traffic is lighter than usual. The tape of the day’s tensions and demands replays in your mind. You think back to an especially awkward interaction you had with a coworker who seemed to be accusing you of sabotaging one of his projects. At least, his words struck you that way in the moment. You weren’t sure how to respond, so you went with your gut and reacted defensively. With a few hours of reflection, though, you can’t help but wonder if perhaps you overreacted. You…

Car dealership, Sales, Business development, Sales management, Game theory, Decision support system, Decision theory, Time,

Why a Happy Brain Discounts the Future

“I never think of the future—it comes soon enough.” —UNKNOWN Your supervisor calls you one morning and tells you that she is heading up a new initiative. She describes in fine detail what this initiative entails, why the company is allocating a budget for it, and each of the expected outcomes. Eventually, she comes around to the question you thought might be lurking from the second you answered the call: Would you be willing to take a major role in the new effort? The problem is that your docket of projects is already teetering on unmanageable, and that situation won’t be changing anytime soon. You explain this to your supervisor, who tells you that she understands—but, she adds, what she’ll need you to begin doing on the new initiative won’t kick off for at least six months. It is your choice, she emphasizes, and if you decide not to participate, it…

Celestine Prophecy, Coincidence, New Age, Carl Gustav Jung, Human brain,

Brain Seductive Patterns

“There are as many pillows of illusion as flakes in a snowstorm.” —RALPH WALDO EMERSON, CONDUCT OF LIFE Who’s Telling Me What? Let’s try a little thought experiment. First, imagine that you are walking through an airport. As you stroll, you encounter a series of variables that occur randomly, but could easily be interpreted as uncannily coincidental. For instance, the same number (let’s say 429) appears in four different places in the span of about forty-five minutes: the price of a magazine; the time on your watch when you happen to glance at it; a number imprinted on the back of someone’s T-shirt; and the cost of a frozen yogurt. The stroll, and these weird, rapidly occurring coincidences, is leading up to boarding an airplane. As it happens, the number of your flight fits eerily into the trail of coincidences: It’s Flight 1429. You are faced with whether to read meaning into these coincidences or…